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The Tale of Rome – now on 喜马拉雅FM

The Tale of Rome – now 喜马拉雅FM (Himalaya FM)

The Tale of Rome – Himalaya FM & iTunes

Check out these links:

https://itunes.apple.com/cn/podcast/the-tale-of-rome/id1309442993?l=en&mt=2

http://www.ximalaya.com/95452007/album/11327635/

 

And our Next Episodes Are

Episode 16 – The Battle of Lake Regillus

Episode 17 – The Conflict of the Orders

Episode 18 – The Twelve Tables

Episode 19 – The Battle of Mons Algidus

Episode 20 – Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus

Episode 15 – King Lars Porsenna

— The Romans gave him as much land as he could circle in one day with an ox and a plow, and they’d also give him a cow.

During the first years of the republic, Rome was invaded, conquered and taken by Etruscan King Lars Porsenna. But we’ll also hear the Roman version of that, and hopefully know what exactly happened.

Partial Transcript

Hello, this is Abel, speaking from Beijing, China. Welcome to my podcast.

The Tale of Rome, Episode 15 — King Lars Porsenna.

Last week we had that Tarquin the Proud managed to convince the king of a city called Clusium to invade Rome with his forces. That king’s name was Lars Porsenna.

[…]

Finally, Valerius also ordered the Roman Senate to gather on the very next day, and to vote for the missing consul, because he had no intentions of being the only consul of Rome.

So.

The Senate voted, and decided that the consul replacing late Junius Brutus would be a man called let’s see if you guys can repeat this name after hearing it once, … it would be a man called Spurius Lucretius Tricipitinus.

I can imagine you are having trouble pronouncing that name, just like it did.

But it doesn’t really matter, because that Senator died four or five days after he was elected.

What a lucky Senator! They elect him Consul and the guy dies!

[…]

 

Cold

My cold has me really down and my voice is more comparable to a hippo than anything else. I still can’t talk into a microphone.

So, podcast episodes 15 and 16 will be up next Tuesday, November 7, guys! Sorry about that.

King Lars Porsenna (Episode 15) in 60 hours

Episode 15 – King Lars Porsenna in 60 hours

We will see more details of our Hall-of-Famer, Publius Valerius Publicola, and we will see how the Romans scare the heck out of an Etruscan king.

We will also introduce the marvelous story of Cloelia, a gorgeous, young girl who just didn’t want to accept her fate, and did what she had to do to change it.

Last but not least, a Roman decides to burn down the only bridge of Rome. We’ll see why.

Episode 14 – Life and Death of Junius Brutus

– Those guys must have had nerves of steel, the conscience of a vampire, the memory of a fly, and the stomach of a Nile crocodile.

The end of the battle at the Arsian Forest, and the end of the life of Consul Lucius Junius Brutus. We will see that Rome offers him a year-long mourning.

Partial Transcript

Two weeks ago we found ourselves in the middle of the battle of the Arsian forest.

On one side, we had the forces of former King Tarquin, together with forces of the Etruscan city of Veii, and on the side there were the forces of Rome, directed by Junius Brutus and Publius Valerius.

When Arruns saw that the army of Rome being commanded by Brutus, he exclaimed

“That’s the man who kicked us out of Rome!”

Watch how he proudly advances, adorned with our flag!

O Gods, Avengers of Kings, help me!

As was custom and honor at that time, both Arruns and Junius Brutus threw their horses at full gallop, one towards the other, knowing that if they could just hurt the other, the entire battle would shift to a side, just like crooked salt vendor’s scale in a Roman forum.

But, they both managed to sink the spears and penetrate the other’s shield, and both fell off their horses in the very same instant.

They died the next instant, spears deeply nailed in their torsos.

Historically speaking, although these types of duels probably contain a strong mythical element, scholars of ancient Rome say that this kind of personal combat represented a very common aspect of war within the Roman military system, and should not be discounted as a far-fetched tale.

The long tradition of the so-called spolia opina, which involves a Roman commander defeating an enemy commander in a hand-to-hand combat, insinuates that this type of events did indeed happen, every so often.

[…]

But if you take a closer look, and if we take the interpretation of the priestess at Delphi seriously, it was neither Arruns nor Titus who ruled Rome after the old Tarquin was done ruling Rome.

It was Junius Brutus.

[…]

State of the Union – 509 BC MAPS

—No other civilization has ever been Master of all the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea.

509 B.C. MAPS

Here are four maps that might help you have a better understanding of the world around Rome.

As I said in my Episode 13 – State of the Union – 509 BC, all four maps are related to the year of the Found if the Roman Republic: 509 B.C.


The Many Kingdoms of Asia Minor


Greeks in the South of Italy


The Western Mediterranean Sea


The Persian Empire

 

 

Episode 13 — State of the Union – 509 BC

Thank you, Mr. Uderzo!
And thank you, Mr. Goscinny, may you rest in peace.

A huge episode. 43 minutes in length. It is a gigantic eagle’s fly around the world of Rome, and all lands that, sooner or later, will influence the Tale of Rome.

Partial Transcript

Hello, this is Abel, in Beijing, China. Welcome to my podcast.

The Tale of Rome, Episode 13 — State of the Union – 509 BC.

This is our first episode of the State of the Union, and just as many things that happened in Rome for the first time, this episode will have the honor and the duty to establish norms, styles, and other precedents for future editions of episodes of the State of the Union.

If you heard our last episode, you’ll know that this week’s episode will be a little longer, and we won’t have our Word of the Week segment.

So, let’s start right now, because we don’t have all day, and we have an eagle’s flight of many miles in circumference.

Our eagle’s flight is going to start in Rome itself.

We’ll see what is going on in Rome, Etruria, and Graetia Magna, which is the southern part of Italy.

From there, we’ll see the three large islands near Italy. Sicily, Corsica, and Sardinia.

Then we’ll go to the north, and once we hit the Alps, we will give a gigantic clockwise turn, that will take us through all the parts that sooner or later will have an influence in the history of Rome.

We’ll see Dalmatia, Macedonia, Epirus, and Greece.

From there we’ll head over to Asia minor, and then to the lands of Syria, Palestine, and Egypt, which at that time were under the yoke of the Persians.

Then our flight will take a sharp turn towards the sunset, towards Carthage and the northern coast of Africa, and then we will fly over the columns of the Gibraltar, which depending on whom you’ve read, were either opened or closed by Hercules himself.

This will take us back to Europe, where we shall see the peoples who inhabited what is now Spain and Portugal, and the Gauls. We will make a small detour to mention the British Isles, and from there we will return to Rome, flying over the villages of the Netherlands and Germania.

Finally, two small penalty shots, just for kicks: India and China.

What do you think?

Episodes 13, 14, and 15

Episodes 13, 14, and 15 Announced

Here are the covers for our next three Episodes

A long special episode called “The State of the Union – 509 BC”

Rome mourned Lucius Junius Brutus for a whole year

An Etruscan king who came to the doors of Rome

Episode 12 – The First Two Consuls

That’s what I love about Rome. They kick each other, regardless of family lines, or family ties. So much for family love!

Rome gets to choose two Consuls, then they change their mind about one of their fresh Consuls-elect, and replace him with one of the most famous public servants ever – even today: Publius Valerius Publicola.

Partial Transcript

Hello, this is Abel, in Beijing, China. Welcome to my podcast.

The Tale of Rome, Episode 12 — The First Two Consuls.

Last week, we saw—finally, the final moments of the monarchy in Rome.

We saw how Tarquin the Proud got locked out of his own city, after the rebellion started by Lucius Brutus and Lucius Collatinus.

Without any soldiers left, and knowing that the gates of Rome would be blocked, he and the idiot of his son went into exile.

Today we will see how that exile of his went on, and what exactly happened after Romans got to taste their very first hours without kings.

The very first order of the Roman Senate was to publicly declare Tarquin as an Enemy of the State, and that Rome would never again be ruled by a king.

Neither the king nor his wife Tullia would ever be allowed to put their feet within the city of Rome, and here I want to add that Romans sent a very strong message for Tullia, as a persona non-grata in their city. Do not come back to Rome, as you have killed your own father, back in the time when nobody could do anything about it.

Even though that was decades ago, Romans did not forget.

[…]

I don’t know if you guys realized, but both these guys were relatives of the king Rome had just kicked out.

Excuse me? They kick a king out of their city, and they put two of his relatives as the first two Consuls of Rome?

Yep. Lucius Tarquinius Collatinus was the ex-king’s cousin, and Lucius Junius Brutus was the ex-king’s nephew.

That’s what I love about Rome. They kick each other, regardless of family lines, or family ties.

So much for family love!

[…]

Episode 12 in 48 hours

Episode 12 – The First Two Consuls, in 48 hours

The King has been forced to seek refuge in Etruria, and that son of his is dead. Who will the Roman Senate elect as their two very first Consuls-elect? Find out, in 48 hours.

Podcaster’s Coach

Podcaster’s Coach

Alexander Laurin interviews me

I was recently interviewed by Alexander Laurin, from Podcaster’s Coach as we were all excited to be working on the International Podcast Day show. Both Alexander and I were speakers at the #InternationalPodcastDay show, which was last September 30th (and every year on September 30th – hint, hint, mark your calendars!) and turned out to be an awesome festival with more than 13 countries and 50 speakers involved.

So, here is the interview Alexander Laurin so cordially invited me to, take a listen.

I want to thank Alexander Laurin, and let you all guys know that I am looking forward to more of this. More interviews, more festival, more fun, and more podcasts!

Thank you all!

14 seconds – The Tale of Rome

14 seconds – The Tale of Rome

Episode 11 – Rome 1 – Athens 0

Romans didn’t like being second, especially when it came to a little word like democracy.

King Tarquin the Proud is kicked out of Rome, and his son Sextus was the main cause. We learn of a rape that shaped the world of Rome, and perhaps the entire western world.

Partial Transcript

Hello, this is Abel, in Beijing, China. Welcome to my podcast.

The Tale of Rome, Episode 11 — Rome 1 – Athens 0.

This episode has a rather soccer-type title name, because the Romans—let me repeat that, the Romans claim that their republic started in the year 509 BC.

Personally, I don’t buy it, not even for a minute, but—since all we have are the records written by the Romans themselves, and since we do not have a time machine, we have to stick to their version.

Romans didn’t like being second, especially when it came to a little word like DEMOCRACY.

Turns out that, in the year 508 BC, and according to some historians—507 BC, something happened in Greece.

A man named Kleisthenes, a noble Athenian made significant reforms to the constitution of ancient Athens, and so he set his city on a democratic footing in either 508 or 507 BC.

So, then—the reaction of the Romans, actually, the reaction of those who rewrote the hsitory of Rome some centuries later, was to make a fine-tuning to their own history.

Let us have Rome get their democarcy a year earlier.

So, Rome’s demacracy arrived to the the Romans in the year 509 BC. A clever move, and a good goal.

Partial score: Rome 1 – Athens 0.

And please notice that I said “PARTIAL SCORE” because this game is far from over, and we are centuries away from the end-game whistle.

Last week we saw that Tarquin the Proud was mistreating his people. The rich, the poor, and everyone in between, plus—the people around Rome, too.

And we got to the point where Tarqin was busy setting up a siege to a city called Ardea, near the coast of the Mediterranean Sea.

But before we get to our Latin word of the day, I would like you to imagine this:

Sping in Rome, really early in the morning, way before the Sun rises.

As snow in the mountains melted, thawing rivers and streams to the east and north of Rome were feeding the plains around Rome, and many small, wooden bridges were carried away by the quiet, yet unrestrainable force of nature.

Through this landscape, a horseman was riding on his black horse, at full speed. He was heading south, and he was avoiding village crossroads and bridges, trying not to be seen. Romans rose early, and this added to his haste. Rome was fading behind him, and a lapis lazuli sliver on the sky was announcing the first break of dawn.

[…]

Lucretia died less than a few minutes later, but while she was dying she asked the three men to avenge her life, and to make sure that Rome was free of men like Tarquin the Proud, and that son of his.

Needless to say, the three men decided to make sure, her dying wish was to be fulfilled, otherwise our story wouldn’t match now, would it?

[…]

The Tale of Rome is on Stitcher

The Tale of Rome is on Stitcher!

Thank you, @Stitcher, right in time for the #InternationalPodcastDay !

Episode 10 – The Tyrant and the Sibyl

The Tale of Rome – King Tarquin the Proud is the ruler of Rome, and it’s not a good thing for its citizen and neighbors. But an old hag with magic powers, also known as a Sybil, makes the king’s life miserable with a strange proposal…

Partial Transcript

Hello, this is Abel, in Beijing, China. Welcome to my podcast.

The Tale of Rome, Episode 10 — The Tyrant and the Sibyl.

Last week we saw the end of Servius Tullius’ life, and how his son-in-law usurped the throne of Rome. And luckily, I already gave you guys a brief description of this kings’ character, so let’s go ahead and see the first part of his reign.

[…]

The king was the law. His power over life and death, war and peace, rich and poor, were all undisputed.

The Roman Senate, utterly ignored and completely laughed at by the king himself, became a bunch of old men who just went to work, and looked forward to going back home, having survived another day.

They walked around the forum and their city in total fear when the king was around, and in total shame when the king was elsewhere, busy tormenting people outside of Rome.

To put it in one sentence, Tarquin rendered the Senate totally anemic, and too weak to fight his power.

Well, while the king’s reign progressed this way, and old woman arrived in Rome, and she immediately asked for an audience with the king.

But according to historians we know that this old hag was no ordinary old lady, and that in fact, she was really one of the legendary ten Sibyls, and she came all the way from what is today’s Turkey. Sibyls were known to possess tremendous powers, and Romans—as well as Etruscans, knew better than crossing a Sibyl and her magic.

[…]

Episode 10 in 72 hours: The Worst King of Rome

The Worst King of Rome – Tarquin the Proud

Episode 10 of THE TALE OF ROME, in 72 hours.

As we get closer to the world’s most famous republic ever, we are about to kick out the worst king Rome ever had. Tarquin the Proud.

Episode 9 – Killed by his own Daughter

The Tale of Rome – Servius Tullius ends up under the wheels of a chariot, driven by none other than his very own daughter Tullia. We are also approaching the birth of the Republic of Rome.

Partial Transcript

Hello, this is Abel, in Beijing, China. Welcome to my podcast.

The Tale of Rome, Episode 9 — Killed by his own Daughter.

Last week we saw the end of Tarquin the Elder, and how Servius Tullius became the sixth king of Rome.

This week, we’ll see how this Tale continues.

The one thing we need to highlight again, is that the last three kings were the father—Tarquin the Elder, followed by his adoptive son—Servius Tullius, and then followed by his true blood son, Tarquin the Proud.

[…]

The tale goes, that—and this is according to Livy himself, the very own daughter of Servius, took a chariot and drove over the dying body of her father, effectively finishing his reign.

That’s right, Tullia, wife of Lucius, and daughter of Servius Tullius, carefully maneuvered the chariot so that the wheels sliced the old man’s body in two.

[…]

Episode 8 – Tarquin the Elder

The Tale of Rome. The life and death of the first of the Tarquins, and a curious prophecy that came true.

Partial Transcript

Hello, this is Abel, in Beijing, China. Welcome to my podcast.

The Tale of Rome, Episode 8 — Tarquin the Elder.

Last week we saw the life of Ancus Marcius and Rome’s expansion to the Mediterranean Sea.

This week we’ll see the life of Tarquin, aptly nicknamed “the Elder” –after he managed to send away the two sons of Ancus Marcius away from Rome, and have himself elected king of Rome by a more-than-willing-to-oblige bunch of Senators.

And here I’d like to add that the tale of the Kings of Rome can be roughly divided into two big sections.

The first one consisted of Romulus, Numa Pompilius, Tullus Hostilius, and Ancus Marcius.

So, first a fighter. Then a pacifist. Then another fighter, and finally another pacifist who saw himself forced to wage wars, and ultimately did just that.

And so, today we are officially starting the second part of the tale of the Kings, because the three kings we haven’t seen yet, they all belong to one—the same family. The Tarquins.

And first among these is Lucius Tarquinius Priscus.

Then, we have Servius Tullius, an adopted son of Tarquin the Elder, and lastly, the real son of Tarquin, whom history named Tarquin the Proud, who took the throne by force, and who ended up being such a bad king, that the Romans kicked him out of Rome, and decided never again to have kings.

[…]

Let’s quickly mention here, that this was not out of the customary, since kings often sat at the forum, and acted as judges in people’s differences and disputes.

But then, when the king, too, was going to take his seat, one of the guys, ran to the king, and took out an axe that he had hidden in his robes.

In a single stroke, he lodged the axe, blade-deep, into the head of the king.

[…]

Double score for The Tale of Rome

Episodes 8 and 9 – in 48 hours

I’d like to announce a double score for this podcast. Come Sunday, you’ll have two new episodes, instead of one, to listen to:

Episode 8 – Tarquin the Elder, and Episode 9 – Killed by his own Daughter. Here are the covers:

That’s right, I’m working very hard to get the two podcasts on the same page, even though the Spanish language podcast, EL CUENTO DE ROMA is still 19 episodes ahead.

See you all, this Sunday evening!

Also, on EL CUENTO DE ROMA, we’ll have Episodio 26 – El Estado de la Unión – 390 AC., which means that we have half a year’s worth in the bag, there. I mean, 52 weeks is one year, right? So the, 26 is half a year…

Episode 7 – Ancus Marcius Founds Ostia

The Tale of Rome – Ancus Marcius, the grandson of Numa Pompilius, shows that he is neither a lame priest nor a cruel bully.

Partial Transcript

Hello, this is Abel, in Beijing, China. Welcome to my podcast.

The Tale of Rome, Episode 7 — Ancus Marcius Founds Ostia.

Last week we saw the life and death of Tullus Hostilius, the third king of Rome, and we also saw how Rome itself became a synonym of war.

In fact, Rome—again, became all the things nobody wanted to have in a neighbor.

This week’s episode deals with the fourth king of Rome, a man named Ancus Marcius.

Ancus Marcius was a man with many different and sometimes contrasting aspects. For one, he was the son of Numa Marcius, who in turn was elected by Numa Pompilius to become Rome’s very first Pontifex Maximus, which we talked about in Episode five.

[…]

We also cannot reliably assess all these events, and their dates. Anecdotes, above all, are to be read as a tale, and rather than taking them as pure facts, they serve the purpose of answering questions of the origins of Rome to the romans that lived centuries later, as well as trying to teach morals.

As a perfect example of these quite incredible mess-ups with dates, we have that Numa Pompilius, the now well-known second king of Rome, was born on April 21st of the year 753 BC, which just so happens to be the day Rome was founded.

Come on! Don’t make me laugh!

The other thing that we can kind of be sure of, is that one of the major jobs Ancus Marcius had to do, was to transcribe all those documents left by Numa Pompilius, about the religious ceremonies of Rome, since the third king of Rome, Tullus Hostilius ignored that job completely.

[…]