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Episode 3 – Roman M Seeking F

Episode 3 – Roman M Seeking F

Romulus takes care of setting up an army and a Senate. Also, he makes sure of getting wives for his new Roman citizens.

Partial Transcription

Hello, this is Abel, speaking from Beijing, China.

Welcome to the Tale of Rome, Episode 3 — Roman M Seeking F.

Last week we saw how, after many generations, Rome was established at the edge of the river Tiber, and we also saw how Romulus, Numitor’s grandson—and son of Rhea Silvia and god Mars, became the first King of Rome.

I think if for a common man there is nothing as sweet as having a home of his own, for a man the size of Romulus, there couldn’t have been anything sweeter than having a city of his own.

The only tiny problem for the moment was that his city was still not able to defend itself, and it also couldn’t grow.

So, we are going to see how Romulus addressed these two issues of high priority.

[…]

After Romulus founded his city, it became pretty obvious that it would be necessary to attract people to the city.

Rome needed new inhabitants.

To that end, Romulus opened the gates of his city, but what happened next was that the first immigrants to the new city were, to put it in nice words, characters of a colorful past.

OK, let’s be more honest here! The first arrivals were people on the run from other places.

Fallen or escaped gladiators, crooks and beggars, fugitive slaves and prisoners of war, people who owed too much money and people who used to collect too much money from others, pimps and smugglers, pickpockets and murderers, and a whole lot more.

You name it, Rome had it!

Anyone who offended any of men’s laws or any of god’s laws, moved to Rome to have a fresh start.

[…]

Episode 2 – Immaculate Conception

Episode 2 – Immaculate Conception

Romulus and Remus are born, grow and help their grandfather Numitor to retake Albalonga’s throne. Afterwards, they found Rome.

Partial Transcription

Hello, this is Abel, speaking from Beijing, China.

Welcome to the Tale of Rome, Episode 2 — Immaculate Conception.

Last Week we saw how Aeneas managed to escape Troy, and how he finally settled on the western coast of Italy. And we saw how his son came to found a city named Albalonga.

Today we will see how his grand-grandchildren prepare the stage for us, so that we get to see how Rome as founded.

And to get there, today we’ve got it all.

Traitors.

Vultures bring messages from the gods.

An amazing saving of two babies floating in a basket along a river. We even have a woman conceiving children in a rather miraculous way, something that people in the western civilizations call an “Immaculate Conception.”

After Ascanius, the kingship was passed from father to son for many generations, until we got to the 13th generation, and the power came to rest upon the shoulders of a man called Numitor.

As Numitor became King of Albalonga, his brother Amulius watched, filled with jealousy and hatred.

Soon enough, Amulius decided to take the throne all to himself, and by lying to the people of Albalonga, and by using false rumors, Amulius managed to chase Numitor out of the city.

The sons of Numitor were killed without any mercy.

But Amulius decided to spare the life of Numitor’s daughter, a woman called Rhea Silvia, and instead of killing her, he ordered her to become a Vestal Virgin. By converting her into a Vestal, Amulius felt assured that she would not have any children, and there would be no threat to his own future generations.

A Vestal Virgin, as historians explain to us, spent her whole life dedicated to the service of the goddess Vesta, goddess of the home and the heart.

Vestals had to fulfill three conditions in order to be accepted in the temple of Vesta, where they would be in charge of keeping the divine flame on, for all eternities.

One: they had to be virgin.

Two: they had to come from a prominent family of the society.

Three: they had to be incredibly beautiful.

Episode 1 – Once Upon a Time

Episode 1 – Once Upon a Time

Aeneas leaves Troy, stays in Carthage for a while, and later navigates to Italy. There, he joins the forces of King Latinus. Later on, Ascanius founds Albalonga.

Partial Transcription

Hello, this is Abel, speaking from Beijing, China.

Welcome to the Tale of Rome, Episode 1 — Once Upon a Time.

Rome was founded in the year 753 BC, but to start our tale we need to do two things:

ONE—I want to tell you a bit about this podcast, as a project, and TWO—we need to travel a little bit back in time. Some 500 years back, to the twelfth century BC.

To the Trojan War, to be more exact.

Alright, let’s go with ONE, and let me sum up this podcast in exactly three sentences.

I was born in what once was called West Germany, and being fond of the history of both China and Rome, I began writing historical fiction novels, one of them being set in Roman Egypt during the latter part of the 2nd century AD.

I soon realized I needed more research to write my book, and after going through many other books, documentaries, maps, and podcasts, I decided I had to create my own account of what actually happened before I could continue with my writing.

Knowing that podcasting was a totally new field to me, I first decided to delve into a narration of the story of Rome in Spanish language—a language I acquired in both Miami and Argentina, while always keeping an eye set on an English version of the same podcast, once the time was right.

So, here we have it. Three sentences.

The Spanish podcast is LIVE since April, and this—the English version, is coming to the world right now, as you are hearing me speak.

And I guess, by now you know where my accent comes from, even though I lived for almost half my life in the States.

And yes, I do live in China now, but that is stuff for some other footnote, in some other episode.

Perhaps.

I also like to say that I started podcasting as a way to talk about the things I like to talk about, such as ancient Rome.

Now, let’s go with TWO. Let’s go to the last years of the Trojan War.

Sneak Peek for The Tale of Rome

The Tale of RomeTime for a Sneak Peek

I am less than 30 days away from launching the English version of this podcast. Its Spanish language counterpart – “El Cuento de Roma” is thriving in Spain, USA, Mexico, Argentina and all over Latin America.

So, it’s time to let you guys hear the first three episodes of this novel-slash-podcast in English.

And the time is now!

I will be releasing the first three episodes of the The Tale of Rome this very week.

Not as an official launch, just as a sneaky-sneaky-peek.

The Tale of Rome

Here are the Covers of these Three Episodes

Once Upon a Time

Immaculate Conception

Roman M Seeking F

 

So, this week I will give you a shout over Social Media, to let you know that these three episodes are ready to have a listen to.

Thank you, all!

Abel A. Kay

 

Episode 18 coming to El Cuento de Roma in 48 hours

The Twelve Tables

Episode 18 of the Spanish podcast El Cuento de Roma,
The Twelve Tables” is coming in 48 hours!

Here is our future English version counterpart.

It’s finally time to make the laws of Rome available for everyone to know. And even though most Roman didn’t read, they knew those tables:

Punishment for killing an intruder during nighttime? None.

Daytime? You had to bring him to a magistrate. Alive.

If you threw an unaimed weapon into a crowd, the punishment was a ram.

If an apple from your tree fell onto your neighbor’s ground, the apple was his.

Shaving on a daily basis for men was not mandatory, but you couldn’t face a magistrate for a case of yours without shaving properly. This law was demolished 600 years later. Thank you, Emperor Adrian!

Episode 17 added to El Cuento de Roma

Here is the cover of Episode 17 of my Spanish language podcast,
El Cuento de Roma: El Conflicto Patricio-plebeyo.

 

iTunes | Stitcher | iVoox | Spreaker | TuneIn | PodomaticYouTube

Length: 19 min 10 sec
Language: Spanish
File size: 8.78 MB


And this will be the equivalent cover of the English version:

 

 

Episode 17 coming to El Cuento de Roma in 48 hours

The Conflict of the Orders

Episode 17 of the Spanish podcast El Cuento de Roma,
El Conflicto Patricio-plebeyo” is coming in 48 hours!

Here is our future English version counterpart.

In this chapter, we got it all.

Internal struggles between social classes.
Murder and treason.
Superstitions and magic potions.
A famous coward, and a silent girl who did what nobody believed she’d dare to do.

A podcasters’ workday

A podcasters’ workday

Here is a screenshot of what a normal morning looks like when I am dedicating my time to podcasting. Imagine coffee on the side, plenty of post-it notes, and a paper notebook.
Little Arwen has just been taken to kindergarten, so it’s quite silent…

Today, it’s time to clean three audios for The Tale of Rome, and one audio for El Cuento de Roma.

  1. Noise Removal:Get Noise Profile, then Remove Noise
  2. Compression:  Threshold -15 to -20
  3. Equalize: Bass Boost and Treble Boost
  4. Normalize:  -1 Decibel
  5. Hard Limit:  -4 Decibel
  6. Normalize again: -1 Decibel

 

Rome in Ancient Times

A Video of Rome in Ancient Times.

By Franco Novecento Buttiglieri.

I bumped into this video on one of my Facebook groups (about Rome, of course), and look what I found! AMAZING!

Needless to say, its sound, lights, and the whole mood are just perfect!

Thank you, Franco for allowing me to share this here!

 

Episode 16 added to El Cuento de Roma

Here is the cover of Episode 16 of my Spanish language podcast,
El Cuento de Roma: La batalla del Lago Regilo.

iTunes | Stitcher | iVoox | Spreaker | TuneIn | PodomaticYouTube

Length: 19 min 57 sec
Language: Spanish
File size: 9.14 MB


And this will be the equivalent cover of the English version:

 

Open Letter to Podomatic Podcasts

OPEN LETTER

Hello, this is Abel A. Kay, from abelakay.com and thetaleofrome.com.

I am planning to choose a second publisher to host my podcast episodes, besides my Blubrry + WordPress hosting, and I am seriously considering using Podomatic as a choice. But I have a problem:

After editing a podcast episode that has been uploaded 3 months ago to your site, I get a message that the episode will be updated in about one minute, and I will be able to hear it again.

This was two days ago.

What else should I say, other than that is not the customer support a podcaster deserves, even if on a BASIC account, for the time being?

I am positive that this is an exception, and that Episodes 1 and 2 of my podcast “El Cuento de Roma” will be fixed as soon as somebody is at his desk, come Monday.

Yes, I did get an email about a month ago that if I didn’t upgrade in the next 24 hours I would lose some free PRO-type privileges, but I didn’t expect that meant that my episodes would not be updated in a minute, like the message says on the screen.

Also, at THAT time I was not ready to go PRO… too few episodes, too undecided, too little “umph” from Podomatic’s side.

Please notice that I plan to follow up on this, and as a rather known publisher in both the Miami area, as well as in China and Latin America, I will make this email an OPEN LETTER, so that eventual future users or customers of Podomatic can see that your service quality is impeccable, as I am sure that this issue of mine will be resolved ASAP.

I have now two episodes “BEING PUBLISHED” just because I changed the picture of the episode.

For sure you will be able to prove that THIS is not the norm, and it is rather an exception for an episode update to take two days to be re-published.

Cordially,
Abel A. Kay

YouTube Episode 14 Coming Up

News at El Cuento de Roma

My Spanish podcast YouTube channel is getting episode 14 uploaded.

Life and Death of Junius Brutus

As usually, YouTube videos are uploaded 1 to 2 episodes behind the podcast schedule, for obvious reasons.

 

The tumultuous 6th century BC

The sixth century BC was a very agitated time in almost every part of the world. Here are maps of the years 600 BC, 550 BC, 527 BC, and 500 BC.

 

 

 

 

The Tale of RomeThe three main events, in my opinion, are:
  • Persians begin to seize power, and dominate eastern Mediterranean.
  • Carthage’s merchant empire slowly dominates the western Mediterranean.
  • The Roman republic begins.
The Tale of Rome
Here are some rulers of that century:

Amyntas I, King of Macedonia
Astyages, King of Medes
Bias of Priene, Greek sage
Callimachus, Athenian general
Cambyses II, King of Persia
Chilon of Sparta, Greek sage
Cleisthenes, Tyrant of Athens
Cleomenes I, King of Sparta
Croesus, King of Lydia
Cyaxares, King of Medes
Cyrus the Great, King of Persia
Darius I, King of Persia
Epimenides, Greek seer
Gorgo, Queen of Sparta
King Helü of Wu, King of Wu
Lucius Junius Brutus, co-founder of the Roman Republic
Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, King of Rome
Miltiades, Athenian general and politician
Nabonidus, the last King of Babylon
Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon
Necho II, Pharaoh of Egypt
Pisistratus, tyrant of Athens
Periander, Tyrant of Corinth
Pittacus of Mytilene, Greek politician
Psammetichus III, Pharaoh of Egypt
Servius Tullius, King of Rome
Solon, Athenian statesman

Episode 15 added to El Cuento de Roma

Here is the cover of Episode 15 of my Spanish language podcast,
El Cuento de Roma: El Rey Porsena.

iTunes | Stitcher | iVoox | Spreaker | TuneIn | PodomaticYouTube

Length: 20 min 15 sec
Language: Spanish
File size: 9.29 MB


And this will be the equivalent cover of the English version:

 

The Fasces

The World before Rome around 1200 BC

Before that, agriculture came to Europe… here is how.